Student Finance

Whether you are thinking about studying, already a student, or even the parent of a student
you can find out everything you need to know about student finance.

What can you get?

You’ll normally have to pay your tuition fees as well as your living costs while you’re studying. You can apply for loans to help with these costs.

Tuition Fee Loan

Tuition fees are the amount your university or college charges each year to attend your course. A Tuition Fee Loan covers the cost of your tuition fees. You can get up to £9,000 to cover the fees your university or college charges. If you apply for a Tuition Fee Loan you should confirm the tuition fee charged directly with your university or college annually. This will ensure you apply to SFE for the correct amount.

This is paid direct to your university or college in three instalments throughout the academic year.

You can apply for loans to help with your living costs.

The information on this page is for students thinking about starting a course in the 2016/17 academic year (from 1 August 2016).

Maintenance Loan

This helps with your living costs and is paid to you in three instalments throughout the academic year. The figures shown below are totals for each academic year.

Living with parents Up to £6,904
Studying in London and not living with parents Up to £10,702
Studying outside London and not living with parents Up to £8,200
Living and studying abroad for at least one academic term Up to £9,391

If you’re a full-time student and have an adult, for example your partner, who depends on you financially you might be able to get extra funding.

The information on this page is for students thinking about starting a course in the 2016/17 academic year (from 1 August 2016).

What is Adult Dependants’ Grant?

Adult Dependants’ Grant (ADG) helps with additional costs that you have if you have an adult who depends on you financially.

How much can I get?

The amount of ADG you can get depends on your income and the income of your husband, wife, civil partner, partner or any other adult who depends on your financially. You can get up to £2,757 a year.

How is it paid?

ADG is usually paid in three instalments, one at the start of each term. It’s paid directly into your bank account with your other student finance payments.

Do I have to pay it back?

No, unless you’ve been overpaid or leave your course early.

How do I apply for ADG?

You don’t have to do anything extra to apply for ADG, just make sure you fill in all the sections of your main application for student finance. Don’t forget to send any evidence we ask for, for example, we might ask for evidence of your adult dependant’s income.

Do I need to know anything else?

You can’t apply for ADG for an adult who is getting student finance for their own studies, or a grown-up child who is still dependent on you

If your adult dependant is not your husband, wife, civil partner or partner then their income must be less than £3,796 in the 2016/17 academic year for you to get ADG. We’ll ask you to give us details and evidence of their income for the 2014-15 year. Don’t worry if their income has dropped since then; if their income has dropped by 15% or more you can tell us about this during your application and we’ll take this into account when we assess your application for ADG.

Will getting ADG affect my entitlement to benefits?

ADG will be taken into account when your entitlement to other income-related benefits is worked out.

If you’re a full-time student and have dependent children under the age of 15 (or 17 if they have special educational needs) you might be able to get extra funding to help towards your childcare costs. You can tell us you want to apply for a Childcare Grant (CCG) when you’re filling in your main student finance application.

The information on this page is for students thinking about starting a course in the 2016/17 academic year (from 1 August 2016).

What is CCG?

CCG is help with childcare costs if you’ve got a dependent child under the age of 15 at the beginning of the academic year, or under 17 if they have special educational needs. You have to be using registered, approved childcare.

How much can I get?

Depending on your household income, you can apply for up to 85% of your actual childcare costs during term time and holidays. You can get up to £155.24 per week for one child or up to £266.15 per week if you have two or more children.

How is it paid?

CCG is usually paid in three instalments, one at the start of each term. It’s paid directly into your bank account with your other student finance payments.

Do I have to pay it back?

No, but if your estimates of your childcare costs are too high, or you don’t confirm your actual costs on time you’ll have to repay any CCG that you’ve been overpaid.

How do I apply for CCG?

Tell us on your main application that you want to apply for CCG. Make sure you send us any evidence we’ve asked for, for example we’ll ask for your child’s birth certificate and evidence that they are dependent on you like your tax credit award letter.

We’ll send you a Childcare Grant Application form (CCG1) to fill in. This form will ask you to give us an estimate of your weekly childcare costs. We’ll use this information, and the information on your main application, to work out how much CCG you can get. You can also download a CCG1 form from www.gov.uk/studentfinance

Three times a year you’ll be sent a Childcare Grant Costs Confirmation form (CCG2). This form asks for your childcare provider to confirm how much they’ve charged you. We use this information to make sure you’re getting the right amount of CCG. If you’ve been paid too much or not enough we’ll adjust your next payment.

Make sure you send the CCG2 back when we ask for it, if you don’t we won’t be able to pay any more CCG and will ask you to repay what you’ve already had.

What if I haven’t found a childcare provider yet?

You should apply early so that you get your CCG at the start of your course, this might mean you haven’t found a childcare provider yet. You can still apply for CCG and get your first payment if you don’t know who your childcare provider will be. If you apply without childcare provider details your payments will be capped at £120.02 a week until you give us the details.

Do I need to know anything else?

You can’t get CCG if you, or your husband, wife, civil partner or partner get the childcare element of either Working Tax Credit or Universal Credit, but you can choose to get CCG from us instead.

You’ll also be unable to claim CCG if your husband, wife, civil partner or partner is receiving help with childcare costs from the National Health Service or Tax-Free Childcare from HMRC.

All three and four year olds, and some two year olds, are able to get a free, part-time early-learning place in a pre-school setting. CCG won’t be paid for any period covered by this free place, but it can be paid to cover the cost of any extra childcare.

You can find more information about registered, approved childcare at www.gov.uk/childcare-grant

Will getting CCG affect my entitlement to benefits?

CCG won’t be taken into account when Jobcentre Plus or your local authority’s housing benefit teams are working out your other benefits. HM Revenue and Customs won’t count CCG when they’re working out your entitlement to tax credits, but remember you, or your partner can’t get CCG and the childcare element of Working Tax Credit or Universal Credit at the same time.

If you’re a full-time student and have dependent children you might be able to get extra funding to help with the additional costs that you’ll have.

The information on this page is for students thinking about starting a course in the 2016/17 academic year (from 1 August 2016).

What is Parents’ Learning Allowance?

Parents’ Learning Allowance (PLA) is help with course-related costs if you have children who depend on you. You can apply for PLA even if you choose not to apply for Childcare Grant (CCG).

How much can I get?

The amount you can get depends on your income, and the income of your husband, wife, partner or civil partner (if you have one) and the income of any dependants you have. You can get up to £1,573 a year.

How is it paid?

PLA is usually paid in three instalments, one at the start of each term. It’s paid directly into your bank account with your other student finance payments.

Do I have to pay it back?

No, unless you’ve been overpaid.

How do I apply for PLA?

You don’t have to do anything extra to apply for PLA, just make sure you fill in all the sections of your main application for student finance. Don’t forget to send any evidence we ask for, for example your child’s birth certificate and evidence that they are dependent on you like your tax credit award letter.

Will getting PLA affect my entitlement to benefits?

PLA won’t be taken into account when Jobcentre Plus or your local authority’s housing benefit teams are working out your other benefits. HM Revenue and Customs won’t count PLA when they’re working out your entitlement to tax credits.

Lots of students from overseas choose to study in the UK. If you are an EU national, or the family member of an EU national, and are studying at a university or college in England you might be able to get student finance to help pay for your tuition fees. If you are from outside the EU you will not normally be able to get student finance from us.

Can I apply?

To get a Tuition Fee Loan you must:

  • be an EU national, or the family member of an EU national
  • have lived in the EEA or Switzerland for three years or more before the start of your course, and
  • be studying on a course that qualifies for student finance

How do I know if I am on a course that qualifies for student finance?

Your university or college, and course both need to qualify for student finance.

To qualify for student finance your course must be at a university or college in England that gets public funding. Some private universities or colleges will offer courses that are specifically designated, meaning you could get funding if you are on one of those courses. You should ask your university or college if your course qualifies for funding. Some groups of schools taking part in the School-Centred Initial Teacher Training (SCITT) will also qualify for funding.

Your course must lead to one of the following qualifications:

  • Degree (such as a BA, BSc or BEd)
  • Foundation Degree
  • Diploma of Higher Education (DipEd)
  • Higher National Diploma (HND)
  • Higher National Certificate (HNC)
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)
  • Initial Teacher Training (ITT)
  • Certificate of Higher Education
  • Integrated Masters

How much can I get?

If you and your course qualify you can apply for a Tuition Fee Loan of up to £9,000 if you are studying at a publicly funded university or college.

If you are studying at a private university or college you can get a Tuition Fee Loan of up to £6,000. Your university or college might charge more than this, you will have to arrange with them to pay the difference if they are.

How is my Tuition Fee Loan paid?

We will pay your Tuition Fee Loan straight to the university or college in three instalments once they have told us you are registered on your course.

Do I have to pay it back?

Yes, but not until you have finished or left your course and your income is over £21,000 a year. If you choose to live outside the UK after your course the threshold for repayment might be different.

How do I apply?

You will fill in a paper application form and send it to us at the following address:

Student Finance Services
Student Loans Company
PO Box 89
Darlington
County Durham
England
DL1 9AZ

If you are planning on starting university or college in September 2016, the application form will be available from spring 2016. You should apply as early as possible to make sure your Tuition Fee Loan is ready for the start of your course. This means you might be applying before you have a confirmed place, but you can change your course details later if you accept a place on a different course.

Can I apply for help with my living costs?

EU students can normally only get help to pay for their tuition fees. However, in some circumstances you might be able to apply for help with your living costs in the same way as a UK national.

Have you been living in the UK for five or more years?

If you have been living in the UK for five or more years before the start of your course and your main reason for moving to the UK was not to receive full-time education you can apply as if you were a UK national.

Are you an EEA or Swiss migrant worker?

You might be able to apply for additional student finance as a migrant worker if you, or a family member, are working in the UK and are a national of an EEA country or Switzerland. You have to be living in the UK on the first day of the first academic year of your course and have been living in the EEA or Switzerland for at least three years before the start of your course.

Are you the child of a Swiss national?

You might be able to apply for additional student finance if you are the child of a Swiss national. Your Swiss national parent will be asked to provide evidence that they are living in the UK on the first day of the first academic year of your course.

Are you the child of a Turkish Worker?

You might be able to apply for additional student finance if you are the child of a Turkish national who usually lives and works in the UK. You have to be living in the UK on the first day of the first academic year of your course and have been living in the EEA, Switzerland or Turkey for at least three years before the start of your course.

Where can I get more information?

The international office at your university or college will be able to help you with general questions about coming to the UK to continue your education. They will be used to working with students from all over the world.

You can contact Student Finance Services if you need help with your application or working out what you can apply for. Their phone number is (+44) (0) 141 243 3570 and the office is open from 9:00 to 17:30 GMT from Monday to Friday.

If you are studying in Wales, Northern Ireland or Scotland the support you can get might be different. For more information if you are:

DSAs are grants to help pay the extra essential costs you may have as a direct result of your disability. This includes a:

  • mental-health condition; or
  • specific learning difficulty such as dyslexia or dyspraxia.

DSAs don’t depend on household income – what you can get depends on your individual needs. You don’t have to pay these back.
To be eligible, you must meet the definition of disability under the Equality Act 2010.

What are they for?

DSAs can help cover costs such as:

  • human support;
  • travel costs; and
  • specialist equipment, such as a computer if one is needed.

If you don’t have a computer or your current one does not meet the required specifications, then you may be recommended for a new one. If you started your course in academic year 2015/16 a personal contribution of £200 is required which reflects the minimum cost any student is likely to incur when purchasing a computer. DSAs will fund the difference up to the amount you’ve been assessed for.

We can arrange the supply of your computer through a national network of approved suppliers. If you’re assessed as needing a new computer, we’ll give you more information about this.

If you’re eligible for DSAs support, then you may be required to attend a needs assessment. This is an informal meeting with an experienced Needs Assessor to discuss what equipment and support will help you.

A needs assessment is different from a diagnostic assessment which is used as evidence of dyslexia. Even if you’ve had a diagnostic assessment you must also have a needs assessment.

What to do and when to do it in three easy steps:

1 – Apply

Once you’ve applied for student finance you’ll need to complete a DSAs application form. You only need to complete one of the two forms:

  • DSA1 full – if you’re only applying for DSAs and no other student finance
  • DSA slim – if you have already applied for other student finance such as a Tuition Fee Loan

Both of these forms are available to download at www.gov.uk/studentfinance

If you applied for student finance online and advised that you want to apply for DSAs, you will be able to download a personalised DSAs application form from your online account.

Apply early as the application process can take around 14 weeks.

2 – Get your eligibility notification and book your needs assessment

If you’re eligible for DSAs we may ask you to arrange a needs assessment to find out exactly what equipment and support you might need.

You should only book your needs assessment if we tell you to. To find your nearest approved needs assessment centre go to www.dsa-qag.org.uk.

3 – Get your entitlement notification

This will let you know what specialist equipment and other support DSAs can pay for.

We’ll also give instructions for ordering any specialist equipment or arranging other support. Don’t buy any equipment before receiving your entitlement notification as you won’t be reimbursed for it.

If you’re the parent or partner of a student you might be asked to give us financial details if the student you’re supporting wants to apply for student finance that’s based on their household income.

All eligible students can get a Tuition Fee Loan and some Maintenance Loan no matter what their household income. They can also apply for additional support if they have children or an adult who depends on them financially.

What is household income?

Household income is the income of the student’s parents or their husband, wife, civil partner or partner. It will also include any unearned income the student receives, for example interest from savings or shares. It doesn’t include any income the student might have from full or part-time work.

Students under 25 are normally classed as ‘dependent’, even if they don’t live with their parents. We’ll normally ask for income details from the students’ parents, including their parent’s partner if they live together.

Students are classed as ‘independent’ if they’re 25 or over, but they can also be classed as ‘independent’ if, for example, they are (or have been) married or in a civil partnership, have supported themselves financially for three or more years, or have a child. If the student is classed as ‘independent’ we may ask for the income details of their partner, if they have one.

How do I provide details to support the student’s application?

When the student completes their application they’ll be asked for your name and email address. We’ll send you an email that gives you more detailed instructions. You’ll have to set up an online account, if you don’t already have one, then we’ll ask for details of your income. You should only give us your income details; if you live with a partner we’ll ask for their details separately and add them together to give the student’s household income.

We’ll also ask for your National Insurance number, this means we can check your income and make sure the student is getting everything they’re entitled to.

Do I need to send any evidence?

Depending on your circumstances we might ask for evidence of divorce or separation, any dependent children you have or your income.

You don’t need to send us any financial evidence when you give us your details because we can use your National Insurance number to confirm the figures. Sometimes we’ll ask you for evidence later, this is nothing to worry about and is part of our checks to make sure the student is getting the right amount of student finance.

If we do ask you for evidence you should send us photocopies, not originals, as soon as possible so the student’s application isn’t delayed. We’ll destroy anything you send us securely, once we’ve checked them.

What happens if my income has dropped since tax year 2014-15?

We ask for details of your income in the tax year 2014-15 because this is the most recent tax year where all the information is available. If your income has dropped by 15% or more since then you can ask for the student to be re-assessed based on an estimate of your current income.

For us to do this we need you to fill in a current year income assessment form.

For students studying in academic year 2016/17 the form will be available from April 2016.

When the current tax year is finished we’ll contact you to get confirmation of your actual income, we’ll use this information to recalculate the student finance due for the academic year. We’ll pay the student any amount they’ve been under paid, and if they’ve been overpaid we’ll take that amount from their next payment.

If you’ve given us current year income details for the last academic year we’ll use these details to work out how much student finance the student should get in their next year. When you log in to give your financial details for the next year you’ll see a summary of what you told us before. You’ll need to accept the amounts shown. If your income has changed again you can send us another Current Year Income Assessment form when it becomes available.

How do you apply?

The easiest way to apply is online now – it’s quick and secure. Just go to the student finance application page.

Don’t worry if you haven’t accepted a place at university or college yet. You can apply using your preferred choice and update the details later.

There are four simple steps to applying online:

1. Register

When you register you’ll be given a unique Customer Reference Number and be asked to create a password and secret answer. Keep these safe as you’ll need them to log into your account to check the progress of your application and re-apply for student finance next year.

2. Log into your student finance account and submit your application

Before you start your online application, you should have the following to hand:

  • your valid UK passport, if you have one;
  • your university and course details;
  • your bank account details;
  • your National Insurance number.

If you want to apply for finance that depends on your household income, we’ll ask your parents or partner to give us information about their household income and their National Insurance number.

3. Send any evidence we ask for

We don’t normally need evidence of your household income when you first apply. However, we may contact you, or your parents/partner at a later date and ask for evidence to support your application. For more information on what evidence you might have to send you should read the evidence section.

4. Print, sign and return the Student Finance Online Declaration Form

We can’t pay you until you do!

If your details change

If any of your details change after you’ve applied for student finance, don’t worry – it’s easy to update your application. See the change of circumstances page for more information.

Whether you can get student finance depends on:

  • your personal eligibility;
  • your course; and
  • your university or college

Personal eligibility

Where you live

To apply, you must:

  • be a UK national or have settled status (that is, no restrictions on how long you can stay in the UK);
  • normally live in England; and
  • have been living in the UK for at least three years before the first day of your course.

You might still be able to apply, if you’re:

  • an EU national, or a relative of one;
  • a refugee, or a relative of one;
  • under Humanitarian Protection, or a relative of someone under Humanitarian Protection;
  • an EEA/Swiss migrant worker, or a relative of one;
  • the child of a Swiss national; or
  • the child of a Turkish worker.

If you normally live in the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man you can’t apply to Student Finance England. You should contact the education authority on your island to apply for student finance.

Previous study

Usually you can only get student finance for your first higher-education qualification. As a general rule, Tuition Fee Loans are available for the full length of the course, plus one extra year if needed, for example if:

  • you change your course; or
  • you leave your course but decide to start again.

The number of years for which you are eligible for funding is calculated as:

Length of current course + one additional year – years of previous study

You might be able to get an extra year of tuition fee support if you need to repeat a year due to compelling personal reasons.

If you’ve previously studied in the UK or abroad, you might be able to get some financial support if you don’t have an equivalent or higher-level qualification, or if you’re studying a course which leads to a professional qualification, such as medicine, veterinary science or architecture.

Your course

The course you plan to study must be in the UK and one of the following:

  • first degree, eg BA, BSc or BEd;
  • Foundation Degree;
  • Certificate of Higher Education;
  • Higher National Certificate (HNC);
  • Higher National Diploma (HND);
  • Diploma of Higher Education (DipHE);
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE);
  • Integrated Masters; or
  • Initial Teacher Training (ITT).

If you’re not sure whether your course qualifies for student finance, check with your university or college.

Your university or college

Your university or college must be in the UK and either:

  • publicly funded (paid for by the government); or
  • privately funded but running individual courses that receive public funding.
Living with parents Up to £6,904
Studying in London and not living with parents Up to £10,702
Studying outside London and not living with parents Up to £8,200
Living and studying abroad for at least one academic term Up to £9,391

Applying for your student finance is easy, however making sure you get your money on time depends on you supplying us with the correct information.

It’s important that you understand what types of information and evidence you need to supply based on the types of finance you’re applying for.

For new full-time students, there are two types of evidence we can ask for – proof of identity and proof of household income.

First time applicants

The first time you apply for student finance you need to prove your identity. This will help us check if you’re eligible for student finance. If you apply for finance that depends on household income, sometimes called ‘means-tested’ or ‘income-assessed’, your parents or partner will need to provide us with financial information and their National Insurance number. You may also be asked to send in other pieces of evidence depending on your circumstances.

Proving your identity

The easiest way for you to prove who you are is to give us your valid UK passport details when applying. We use this to confirm your identity which means you don’t have to send us your original passport. If you don’t have a valid UK passport then you’ll need to send your UK birth or adoption certificate or valid non-UK passport. These must be the original documents.

In some circumstances, non-UK students will need to provide additional Home Office documents along with their non-UK passport. If this applies to you we’ll let you know at the end of your application.

Household income

Some student finance you can get depends on your household income – that’s the income of your parent(s) or you and your partner.

In some cases, we may contact your parent(s) or partner directly to ask for further evidence of their income, which may include things such as photocopies of a P60 or payslips. This is part of our checks to make sure you get the correct amount of funding.

Remember, it’s important we get all the correct information as soon as possible. If we don’t, it might mean you don’t get your money on time for starting your course, or even worse, you might not get all the money you’re entitled to!

Any questions? Visit us or speak directly to one of our student finance experts!

London School of Business
Boardman House, 64 Broadway
Stratford, E15 1NT
Tel:    020 3305 8124
Mob:  075 8479 5607

Your Tuition Fee Loan will be paid in three instalments directly to your university or college. Any Maintenance Loan or Maintenance Grant you’re entitled to will also be paid at the same time throughout the academic year directly into your bank account.

In most cases the money will be available for you right away but some banks take longer to clear the funds. If your money is not there on your scheduled date please contact your bank first, as they’re more likely to be able to let you know when your money will clear.

If you’re still waiting on your first instalment, make sure your bank account details are up to date! You can do this by logging on to your account at www.gov.uk/studentfinance and going to My Account>Update bank details.

Here’s a checklist to make sure you get your money at the start of term:

You’ve submitted your application and all the correct supporting evidence.
You’ve signed and returned your declaration form.
You’ve registered at university/college.
Your university/college has confirmed that you have registered with them.
You’ve allowed a few working days for the funds to be paid into your bank account.
There are some circumstances, such as withdrawing from your course, where you could be paid more money than you’re entitled to. If this happens we’ll contact you about repaying or reduce any future student finance you are entitled to by the amount we’ve overpaid.

Need Help Choosing A Programme or Applying Student Finance?

Choosing the right programme is an important part of the future success. Our dedicated student counsellor would be happy to assist you to choose the right programme which best suits your professional goals. We can also help you to apply for the student finance as well as arranging your all necessary documents.

Please contact Agata (020 3305 8124, 075 8479 5607, International@lsbuk.com) to find out more.

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